earthquake at Pakistan, Iran…….

earthquake at Pakistan, Iran…….

Boston pic.

Boston pic.

Boston blast….

Boston blast….

unknown

unknown

My empty cup.

My empty cup.

BRANDING CONCEPT | DIGITAL BRANDING
http://bit.ly/WRXECM

BRANDING CONCEPT | DIGITAL BRANDING

http://bit.ly/WRXECM

Communication is not the straightforward process people often imagine. Although we tend to believe that communication is a linear process (someone says something, the other person hears it, the message got through) it is rarely that simple. Apart from the obvious problems of misunderstanding, mishearing, only getting part of the message, and so forth, there is the problem that people interpret messages in the light of previous experience.

Speaking the customer’s language means more than just using the right words—people interpret everything by considering the source as well. Framing the communication in a way people can relate to is an essential part of designing a communication—but it isn’t always easy to do.
The British Department of Transport found that around 55 teenage pedestrians a week were involved in accidents on the roads, usually caused by inattention—crossing the road while texting, filming each other on cellphones, and so forth. Research showed that teenagers consistently overestimate their capabilities as road users, and also they receive so many messages about safety and health issues they screen most of them out (especially messages from the government). The only messages that get through are those that they feel touch them personally.

With this in mind, the Department produced an advertisement that appeared to have been filmed through a cellphone camera, showing teenagers laughing in the street: the camera follows one youth as he dances out into the road and is hit by a car. The strapline says “55 teenagers a week wish they’d given the road their full attention.” The ad was not created by professional movie-makers: to gain footage, the Department simply gave 14 groups of teenagers a cellphone camera and asked them to film their usual activities. The group used in the advertisement is an actual group of friends (from Stoke Newington in London) and only the final crash scene is performed by a stunt driver and stunt artist.
By using the kind of imagery teenagers use themselves, the advertisements were hard-hitting without being patronizing: the campaign got the message through. In post-tests following the ad being screened in movie theaters and on TV, 79 percent of respondents remembered the ad in a prompted recall, 95 percent said it made them rethink their attitudes to road safety, and 93 percent said it made them realize it could happen again. In the year following the ad, accidents involving teenagers fell by 10 percent.

By avoiding the patronizing “Hey, kids, road safety is cool!” type of approach, the Department produced a highly successful campaign.
Practice
• Don’t try to guess what the target audience’s language is—let them tell you.
• People don’t like to be patronized—don’t talk down to your audience.
• Remember that people think about communications, and take the source into account.
• Communication is not a linear process—you cannot assume that because you sent a message, and the other person received it, that the information has been correctly transferred.
Communication is not the straightforward process people often imagine. Although we tend to believe that communication is a linear process (someone says something, the other person hears it, the message got through) it is rarely that simple. Apart from the obvious problems of misunderstanding, mishearing, only getting part of the message, and so forth, there is the problem that people interpret messages in the light of previous experience.
Speaking the customer’s language means more than just using the right words—people interpret everything by considering the source as well. Framing the communication in a way people can relate to is an essential part of designing a communication—but it isn’t always easy to do.
The British Department of Transport found that around 55 teenage pedestrians a week were involved in accidents on the roads, usually caused by inattention—crossing the road while texting, filming each other on cellphones, and so forth. Research showed that teenagers consistently overestimate their capabilities as road users, and also they receive so many messages about safety and health issues they screen most of them out (especially messages from the government). The only messages that get through are those that they feel touch them personally.
With this in mind, the Department produced an advertisement that appeared to have been filmed through a cellphone camera, showing teenagers laughing in the street: the camera follows one youth as he dances out into the road and is hit by a car. The strapline says “55 teenagers a week wish they’d given the road their full attention.” The ad was not created by professional movie-makers: to gain footage, the Department simply gave 14 groups of teenagers a cellphone camera and asked them to film their usual activities. The group used in the advertisement is an actual group of friends (from Stoke Newington in London) and only the final crash scene is performed by a stunt driver and stunt artist.
By using the kind of imagery teenagers use themselves, the advertisements were hard-hitting without being patronizing: the campaign got the message through. In post-tests following the ad being screened in movie theaters and on TV, 79 percent of respondents remembered the ad in a prompted recall, 95 percent said it made them rethink their attitudes to road safety, and 93 percent said it made them realize it could happen again. In the year following the ad, accidents involving teenagers fell by 10 percent.
By avoiding the patronizing “Hey, kids, road safety is cool!” type of approach, the Department produced a highly successful campaign.
Practice
• Don’t try to guess what the target audience’s language is—let them tell you.
• People don’t like to be patronized—don’t talk down to your audience.
• Remember that people think about communications, and take the source into account.
• Communication is not a linear process—you cannot assume that because you sent a message, and the other person received it, that the information has been correctly transferred.
The easier it is to buy from you, the more likely people are to do it, and yet many firms put barriers in the way of their customers. For example, telephoning to order a takeaway meal to be delivered takes time and effort, not to mention telephone charges. People who order takeaway meals are either very tired or very lazy—the less effort they have to put in, the better.
Pizza Magic is a pizza delivery company based in Glasgow. The company delivers throughout the area, and of course most of the orders come in by telephone. Recently, however, the company hit on the idea of allowing customers to order pizzas online.
The company’s website now has the menu, including of course the requisite wide range of additional toppings, and is interactive so that people can order the pizza of their choice and pay for it without speaking to a human being at all.
This has several advantages. First, people who are tired often do not want to talk to anybody, so ordering online is less hassle. Second, the company can easily change its menus, prices, topping options, and so forth without having to reprint all the menus. Third, automating the ordering process means less staff time spent on the telephone. Finally, the possibility of error in transcribing customer orders is virtually eliminated—any errors are likely to be on the customer’s part, or possibly the chef’s.
Of course, people can still order by telephone, or even call in—but the internet offers a very convenient option.
Practice
• Make the website as interactive and user-friendly as possible.
• Ensure that people can still order in the conventional way.
• Store all orders in case of disputes—if possible, send them to delivery personnel cellphones.
The easier it is to buy from you, the more likely people are to do it, and yet many firms put barriers in the way of their customers. For example, telephoning to order a takeaway meal to be delivered takes time and effort, not to mention telephone charges. People who order takeaway meals are either very tired or very lazy—the less effort they have to put in, the better.
Pizza Magic is a pizza delivery company based in Glasgow. The company delivers throughout the area, and of course most of the orders come in by telephone. Recently, however, the company hit on the idea of allowing customers to order pizzas online.
The company’s website now has the menu, including of course the requisite wide range of additional toppings, and is interactive so that people can order the pizza of their choice and pay for it without speaking to a human being at all.
This has several advantages. First, people who are tired often do not want to talk to anybody, so ordering online is less hassle. Second, the company can easily change its menus, prices, topping options, and so forth without having to reprint all the menus. Third, automating the ordering process means less staff time spent on the telephone. Finally, the possibility of error in transcribing customer orders is virtually eliminated—any errors are likely to be on the customer’s part, or possibly the chef’s.
Of course, people can still order by telephone, or even call in—but the internet offers a very convenient option.
Practice
• Make the website as interactive and user-friendly as possible.
• Ensure that people can still order in the conventional way.
• Store all orders in case of disputes—if possible, send them to delivery personnel cellphones.